Students select Tawfick for Everitt Award for Teaching Excellence

2/22/2019

Tawfick gets drenched by his students during the final "Dunk Your Professor" competitions for the Spring 2014 ME 370 course.
Tawfick gets drenched by his students during the final "Dunk Your Professor" competitions for the Spring 2014 ME 370 course.
Assistant Professor Sameh Tawfick was this year’s recipient of the Everitt Award for Teaching Excellence, an honor that is selected by the student-led Engineering Council. This marks the third time in four years that MechSE faculty have won this award.

The Everitt Award was established in 1968 by undergraduate engineering students to honor Dean Emeritus William L. Everitt at the time of his retirement. The award, which annually recognizes one engineering faculty member for outstanding undergraduate teaching, is one of the most coveted awards available to faculty, and serves to emphasize the importance attached to good teaching in the college. The award is made possible through an endowment contributed by the personal and corporate friends of Dean Everitt.

Tawfick was honored for his commitment to helping students achieve their goals in and out of the classroom through innovative teaching methods, and for his continued work as an advocate for students in the classroom. He was a driving force behind the transition of ME 370 (Mechanical Design I) from purely theoretical to include hands-on experiences.

Outside the classroom, Tawfick directs the Kinetic Materials Research Group, which aims to engineer materials by synthesizing and assembling nanostructured building blocks in to larger scales; and to model the mechanical behavior of these materials.

He earned his BS (2003) and MS (2007) in mechanical engineering from Cairo University (Egypt) and his PhD in mechanical engineering in 2012 from the University of Michigan. He joined the MechSE Department in August 2013.

Tawfick, center, helps an ME 370 student save her rope-climbing robot from falling in the Boneyard Creek, Spring 2017.
Tawfick, center, helps an ME 370 student save her rope-climbing robot from falling in the Boneyard Creek, Spring 2017.