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Wagoner Johnson wins SWE teaching award

9/7/2020

Julia Park

Amy Wagoner Johnson
Amy Wagoner Johnson
Professor Amy Wagoner Johnson has been honored with a competitive teaching award from the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). She was one of just three from around the country to win the Distinguished Engineering Educator Award for her significant contributions to the engineering profession through education.

The award also recognizes Wagoner Johnson’s continuing dedication to SWE’s mission—striving to highlight the impact and importance of women in engineering, leading by example, and demonstrating that a career in engineering can be a fulfilling, rewarding pursuit for women of any background. SWE award recipients include professionals and academics from influential businesses, corporations, and universities around the world. 

“I am deeply honored to receive this award. When I started my career as a faculty member, I could not have imagined that I would receive such an award. For many years I found teaching to be really challenging, especially as a young, woman faculty member in engineering. My teaching confidence increased when I found ways to really connect with my students – and I hope as an educator I am able to instill that same confidence in the next generation of women engineers,” said Wagoner Johnson, who also holds an Andersen Faculty Scholar appointment.  

She will accept the award at SWE’s annual conference, WE20, which will be held virtually in November.  

“The men and women recognized have lived and learned through significant contributions to the engineering community, and they continue to lead in their careers and personal lives,” said Heather Doty, president of SWE. “They are leaders paving the way to empower and inspire future women engineers across the globe.”

Founded in 1950, SWE is the world’s largest advocate and catalyst for change for women in engineering and technology. The not-for-profit educational and service organization is the driving force that establishes engineering as a highly desirable career aspiration for women.