Pre-Med Track

Mechanical engineering and engineering mechanics undergraduate students are now able to follow a prescribed track of traditional MechSE courses and newly recommended courses to qualify for medical school—offering incredible opportunities at the intersection of engineering and medicine. Students will stay within the established ME or EM curriculum but also have a tailored program to enable them to work in the medical industry or go to medical school.

pre-med trackA career as a medical physician will demand a depth of skills beyond those typically necessary for engineers. With a curriculum based in problem-solving, teamwork, hands-on designing, a strong foundation in math and physics, and an understanding of big data and computation, MechSE undergraduates who follow the pre-med track will have additional, defined opportunities to develop their leadership skills, service experiences, and personal (soft skills) development to make them competitive among medical school applicants. Students will maintain frequent contact with specialized advisors within MechSE and at the campus Career Center.

As the world’s first engineering-based college of medicine, the new Carle Illinois College of Medicine leverages advanced technology to train physician-innovators who will deliver better, more compassionate and accessible care to patients worldwide.

While MechSE’s pre-med track is designed so students can qualify for practically any medical school, the curriculum will allow an applicant to fulfill Carle Illinois’ robust requirements:

  • Strong background in biology, chemistry/biochemistry, mathematics/statistics, physics, social sciences.
  • Some experience in computer programming and languages, coding, modeling and/or data sciences, healthcare settings.
  • Demonstration of strong interpersonal communication, service, and leadership skills.
  • Considered a plus: innovation, design, entrepreneurship, intellectual property, industrial experience in medical or related settings.

Email MechSE’s pre-med track advisor, Professor Amy Wagoner Johnson, to get started.